Royal Liverpool Golf Club, England

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The Royal Liverpool Golf Club is a leading golf club in Merseyside in North West England. It was founded in 1869 on what was then the racecourse of the Liverpool Hunt Club, and received the “Royal” designation in 1871 due to the patronage of the Duke of Connaught of the day, who was one of Queen Victoria’s younger sons.

Robert Chambers and George Morris (younger brother of Old Tom Morris) were commissioned to lay out the original Hoylake course, which was extended to 18 holes in 1871. Harry Colt, one of the world’s leading golf course architects, redesigned the course early in the 20th century, and it has since been tweaked periodically, mainly as a response to advances in equipment.

Royal Liverpool — or Hoylake, as it is usually known — is the second-oldest seaside links golf course in England, and was the first course in North-West England to host The Open. The club is a place of firsts: the first Amateur Championship in 1885; the first international match between England and Scotland in 1902; the first international between Great Britain and the United States in 1921, now known as the Walker Cup.

It has staged major tournaments throughout its long history including eleven Open Championships and many amateur events. The Club is proud that The Open Championship made a successful return to Hoylake in 2006 when Tiger Woods achieved his third victory. The Club is always pleased to welcome visiting golfers to the Links and to the Clubhouse where our impressive heritage collection is on display.

Although the Club has hosted many great events and many a famous golfing hero has walked the fairways over the years, it is probably best known for its contribution to the amateur game and a place where amateurs feel at home. Aside from hosting the first Amateur Championship there have been other great golfing accomplishments. Harold Hilton, from neighbouring West Kirby, won The Amateur Championship four times and The Open in 1892 and 1897. Hoylake’s own John Ball won The Amateur Championship an amazing eight times, as well as The Open in 1890. By winning The Open at Hoylake in 1930, Bobby Jones secured a place in golf history by winning The Open and The Amateur Championship on both sides of the Atlantic in the same year to achieve his famous ‘Grand Slam’.

Whilst at first appearance the links may look flat, at 6,900 yards from the member’s tees it is a stern test and like all links courses, the wind makes its presence felt. The summer breeze can be your ally and the icy gale a ruthless adversary. All the holes require your utmost attention.

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